Recruiting Projects
dandelion 004

Children/Teens Asthma Study

DO YOU HAVE CHILDREN / TEENS AGED 8-18 YEARS AND WANT TO HELP US WITH A STUDY ON ASTHMA?

We are looking for children and adolescents with and without asthma (aged 8-18 years & living in the Wellington & greater Wellington region) to take part in studies examining the causes of asthma to help develop better prevention and treatment options.

Why are we doing these studies?

Asthma is a major health problem in New Zealand, with one in four children and one in five adults affected. Asthma cannot currently be prevented or cured and treatment options are not fully effective in a large proportion of patients (30-50%). The reasons for this are unclear, but may be because current treatment targets only allergic causes of asthma. Recent evidence suggests that other causes may also be important. In particular, disturbance of the nervous system involved in controlling airway function, or the presence of certain bacteria in the airways may play an important role in asthma, but these are not typically targeted by current asthma drugs. We are recruiting participants for studies which comprehensively examine the causes and mechanisms of asthma, with the aim of developing effective interventions and improved treatment for all asthmatics.

Our studies are funded by the New Zealand Health Research Council.

What do the studies involve?

Participation will initially involve your child completing a short questionnaire about respiratory health and allergies, and a simple lung function test.

We may then contact you (and your child) for further testing, which will involve a more thorough clinical assessment of lung function, allergic status, and airway inflammation.

To express your interest for our asthma study, or for further information about the study, please ring or email:

Phone:   0800 0800 78

Email: asthma@massey.ac.nz

 Projects:

Asthma phenotypes in high and low income countries

Persistent airflow limitation and the airway microbiome in childhood asthma

Non-inflammatory mechanisms in asthma