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Biodiversity & Health Study

Massey University - Biodiversity and Childhood Health Study

Researchers at Massey University are studying how the natural environment affects childhood health.

The aim of the study is to investigate if exposure to greater biodiversity may protect against several common health conditions, including asthma and allergies. If your child is 6-11yrs, whether or not they have asthma and allergies, the research team would be grateful if you would consider taking part!

 You can take part NOW!

Taking part is easy and involves completing a questionnaire and your child taking part in two tests - a breathing and an allergy test. For phase I, parents will be invited to fill out a questionnaire. Participating children will be invited to take part in an exhaled nitric oxide test (measure of airway inflammation) and skin prick allergy test carried out by a trained research nurse. The exhaled NO (FeNO) test involves blowing into a specialised machine for several seconds, which allows us to assess airway inflammation. The skin prick allergy test involves a trained nurse applying small drops of liquid containing allergens to the forearm and then giving a small prick at each drop to see if there is a reaction. This phase can take place at your home or at our research centre and may take 30-45 minutes to complete. 

Later, a smaller number of participants will be invited to take part in a second phase of the study, which would involve taking samples from the mouth, nose, poo, and blood.

To take part in the research, text YES, your name and your child’s name to 021 819 745. Or click TAKE PART NOW to send us an email.

If you have any questions about the study, or if you, or anyone you know, would like any further information please contact the research team:

 

                                Email: asthma@massey.ac.nz

                                Phone: 0508 ASTHMA (278 462)

                                Text (SMS): 021 819 745


Project: Biodiversity and microbiota: a novel pathway to allergy and asthma prevention